Review: Short Stories of The Founding

Book: The Short Stories within The Founding Omnibus

Author: Dan Abnett

My Rating: 4/5 Stars for all 3

As I make my way back through the Gaunt’s Ghosts series I am doing so with the new omnibus editions. I recently posted my review of the first three books in the series which made up the first omnibus volume titled The Founding. This tome also contained three short stories and I would like to quickly review each before moving on to the next volume, The Saint.

A Ghost Return is the opening piece for the omnibus and gives a little backstory to Gaunt before he became Colonel-Commissar of the Tanith regiment. Here we see him as a new commissar serving with his original regiment, the Hyrkans, during the early stages of the Sabbat Worlds Crusade. The plot follows Gaunt and a squad of Hyrkans as they travel deep underneath a hive city to discover a supposed shrine to Saint Sabbat herself – a site that would be very valuable to Warmaster Slaydo if proven credible. Coming in having already read most of the series, I can’t say how well this would hold up as an opener to a newcomer, but I really liked this short introduction to Gaunt. It gives the reader a good understanding of what kind of leader he is and what kind of man he is on the battlefield. It has a good sense of mystery and some action to keep things moving forward. Overall, I felt this was a very well balanced opener to the series for the length of the piece.

Of Their Lives in the Ruins of Their Cities sits nicely in between ­First and Only and Ghostmaker as the second short story of the omnibus. It tells the story of one of Gaunt’s early actions with the Tanith First and Only on the planet of Voltemand. Gaunt leads a small scouting party of Ghosts into a no-man’s land and is ambushed by enemy forces. The troopers around him still seethe with resentment for his decision to abandon Tanith to its fate and not allow them to die in its defense. Now they must decide whether to leave him out to dry and possibly fall to the enemy themselves as a result, or band together and follow their charismatic Colonel-Commissar to victory. The reader is given a look into Gaunt’s psyche as he is haunted by his past and we also meet many characters that go on to become core Tanith soldiers to the series’ later novels. The story was action packed per Abnett’s typical style, this time showing the Ghosts learning to fight as a unit in one of their first engagements. This is a solid addition to the series and I highly recommend to anyone reading along.  

In Remembrance closes this omnibus and the first arc of the story of Gaunt’s Ghosts. It is told through the POV of an artist commissioned by a Vervunhive noble house to commemorate the war that took place in the novel Necropolis. The artist was explicitly told to represent the regiment that was so pivotal to the hive’s victory, the Tanith First and Only. As the sculptor spends time with the Ghosts in the dead hive city he is given a glimpse into what the victory cost the people of the city and the soldiers who survived the defense. As he accompanies a squad of Ghosts into the dead city on a run to clear an area of potential resistance still dug in, he is subjected to the horrors of battle. The story ends with him describing the statue he ends up erecting outside of the dead hive city and how he inevitably couldn’t fully capture his feelings from that day. In Remembrance was very humanistic compared to other Gaunt’s Ghosts novels and focusses on how the surroundings and events impact this non-combatant through whose eyes we see the events unfold. It was a very fitting end to the omnibus and I felt it was a great wrap up to Necropolis specifically.  

Review: Necropolis



Book: Necropolis (Gaunt’s Ghosts #3)

Author: Dan Abnett

My Rating: 5/5 Stars

Recommended for: Anyone who enjoys gritty military science fiction, warhammer 40K fiction, fast paced battle scenes and depictions of intense siege warfare in a sci-fi setting.

My epic reread of the Gaunt’s Ghosts series by Dan Abnett continues with the third installment, Necropolis. Coming off a victory on Monthax, the Ghosts, along with a number of other imperial guard regiments, are redirected from the next Crusade push to help resolve an inter-hive conflict on an industrial world known as Verghast. This world’s manufacturing facilities are one of the major suppliers of war resources for Wamaster Macaroth’s forces, so when Ferrozoica attacks Vervunhive – both of these being massive cities called hives – the Warmaster deems it necessary to send in the guard units to help the imperial citizens of Vervunhive and safeguard the valuable manufacturing capabilities they possess. The Tanith First and Only get their first taste of siege warfare as the enemy sends colossal siege engines, thousands of armored tanks and endless waves of infantry at the walls of the hive city. Can they outlast the deadly onslaught and save the city, along with its millions of inhabitants, from annihilation?

This is the first five star rating I have given to a novel in this series, and it was well deserved. Abnett had clearly found his rhythm by the time he wrote this book. The imagery he evokes is quite astounding given the scale of the setting; a hive city is a colossal collection of human existence that spans out and up, with an immense spire in the center. These cities are built up over thousands of years and can reach upwards of 6-7miles high, housing countless millions of people. The action packed story sees Ghosts, along with many other imperial units, fighting on the walls and in the streets against the Chaos infected troopers of the enemy hive. Abnett delivers yet again – he is, as I have said before, a master when it comes to writing clear battle scenes and with each successive novel his skills improve. I was constantly on the edge of my seat as my favorite characters fought for their lives in the smoke clogged streets of the city.

Our main characters are all back, as devoted to the Emperor and the memory of their lost home world as ever. They will need that devotion as the siege defense proves to be their most bitter battle yet. We also get to see things from the POV of many Vervunhive citizens; the novel begins with a couple chapter solely devoted to Vervunhive and as such, we don’t see an inkling of Gaunt or his Ghosts until the war between hives is well underway. Those early chapters were some of my favorite of the book as they really helped give character to the setting and they set things up for a coupe of new main characters coming to the series. Once the devastation ends the Ghosts might have some boots to fill. On that note, one of the best things about Necropolis is that we finally have some women characters! I know it is a common complaint I have seen about the first two books in the series. I don’t know if those same complaints made it to Abnett back in the early 2000s when these we written and this was him responding or it was just coincidence, but it is nice to see the gender pool widen a bit for the series.

In my opinion, the best part of this novel, and the part that probably nudged me to add that fifth star, is that Gaunt grows so much between his arrival on the world and the ending. Reading his part in this story was an absolute blast as he finally embraces his role as a Commissar in light of the staggering level of political bullshit he has to wade through to ensure his regiment and the city make it through the war in one piece. There is no denying that up to this point, Gaunt has certainly proven his courage and valor on the battlefield and proven himself a sound commander. What shines through here, though, is his heroism in the political arena of the commissariat. It is what makes him such an interesting character – he holds the title of Colonel-Commissar and in Necropolis we finally see his heroics evolve into a form that embodies both titles, not just the former.

Overall, this was a very solid ending to the first arc of the series and I can’t wait to move ahead because the next arc is arguably my favorite. For any fans of Warhammer 40K and Gaunt’s Ghosts, this book is a must read. I cheered, I cried and I smelled the discharge of las-weapons. This novel swept me away and I didn’t reach out for support.



Review: Waking Gods

Book: Waking Gods

Author: Sylvain Neuvel

My Rating: 3/5 Stars

Recommended for: Anyone who loves hard sci-fi, good world building, interview style storytelling and stories of aliens coming to Earth.

Let me start by saying that Waking Gods could have been a four or five star read for me, but it just didn’t quite deliver the way I wanted it to. The novel picks up where Sleeping Giants left off. Earth has discovered a giant alien robot that they named Themis and a group named the Earth Defense Corp (EDC) is busy trying to unravel how it works. The interviews that tell the bulk of the story are conducted by a mysterious, un-named character who is powerful enough to command respect and attention from the world’s governments. The other main characters are EDC scientist Rose Franklin and the pilots of Themis – a hot headed ex helicopter pilot named Kara Resnik and her husband, linguist Vincent Couture. Waking Gods starts eight years or so after the events of the first book; a second giant robot has appeared in the middle of London and the world must decide how to respond…

First off, I love the way the books in this series are written. When I read World War Z in college I fell in love with the way a story could be told through interviews. Waking Gods adds in some journal entries and notes, but for the most part the interviews of our main characters, as well as many auxiliary characters, do a good job telling the story. Along with the mode of storytelling, the hard sci-fi themes really got my neurons firing. Without giving away the plot, there are multiple scientific speculative sci-fi explanations of genetics and physics that I found fascinating. This deep, geeky world building is what I love most about sci-fi and it made me happy to see it here. Lastly, the first book in the series left a lot on the table regarding the aliens, the mysterious interviewer, the robot itself and many other aspects of the world. In Waking Gods, a lot of my questions were answered and I liked the direction the author took most of these reveals. Overall, there was a lot to love here and I do recommend hard sci-fi lovers give this series a chance because it kills it in that regard.

(P.S. – The cover is beautiful. All three novels in this series have very cool cover artwork!)

What comes up, though, must come down. In my opinion, there is a lot of room for growth with the overall writing style. The pace felt off, some of the dialogue felt cheesy and forced and the ending was chaotic. Chaos isn’t inherently a bad thing in a book, some of my favorite novels embrace chaos, but here I felt it didn’t work with the style of storytelling. At the end it left me feeling like half of the plot was crammed into the last fifty pages and for me it didn’t work well. There is also a strong sense of loss in this novel, one that I found to be very depressing and hard to wrap my head around. Now, it wasn’t the loss itself that I found hard to bear; I think loss and death are powerful weapons in the storyteller’s arsenal and can really help convey a sense of reality to a work of fiction. What I didn’t like was how the characters handled the loss – it felt hollow and unbelievable. I think this could have been remedied by adding some depth to the emotions the characters were feeling. Overall, I think the book could have benefitted from another fifty or so pages to help flesh these things out.

While I believe it was overall a flawed work, I still enjoyed the story and am looking forward to finding out what happens in the conclusion to the series in Only Human. Thanks for reading another review and look out in the weeks to come for my review of the concluding work in The Themis Files!