Review: Short Stories of The Founding

Book: The Short Stories within The Founding Omnibus

Author: Dan Abnett

My Rating: 4/5 Stars for all 3

As I make my way back through the Gaunt’s Ghosts series I am doing so with the new omnibus editions. I recently posted my review of the first three books in the series which made up the first omnibus volume titled The Founding. This tome also contained three short stories and I would like to quickly review each before moving on to the next volume, The Saint.

A Ghost Return is the opening piece for the omnibus and gives a little backstory to Gaunt before he became Colonel-Commissar of the Tanith regiment. Here we see him as a new commissar serving with his original regiment, the Hyrkans, during the early stages of the Sabbat Worlds Crusade. The plot follows Gaunt and a squad of Hyrkans as they travel deep underneath a hive city to discover a supposed shrine to Saint Sabbat herself – a site that would be very valuable to Warmaster Slaydo if proven credible. Coming in having already read most of the series, I can’t say how well this would hold up as an opener to a newcomer, but I really liked this short introduction to Gaunt. It gives the reader a good understanding of what kind of leader he is and what kind of man he is on the battlefield. It has a good sense of mystery and some action to keep things moving forward. Overall, I felt this was a very well balanced opener to the series for the length of the piece.

Of Their Lives in the Ruins of Their Cities sits nicely in between ­First and Only and Ghostmaker as the second short story of the omnibus. It tells the story of one of Gaunt’s early actions with the Tanith First and Only on the planet of Voltemand. Gaunt leads a small scouting party of Ghosts into a no-man’s land and is ambushed by enemy forces. The troopers around him still seethe with resentment for his decision to abandon Tanith to its fate and not allow them to die in its defense. Now they must decide whether to leave him out to dry and possibly fall to the enemy themselves as a result, or band together and follow their charismatic Colonel-Commissar to victory. The reader is given a look into Gaunt’s psyche as he is haunted by his past and we also meet many characters that go on to become core Tanith soldiers to the series’ later novels. The story was action packed per Abnett’s typical style, this time showing the Ghosts learning to fight as a unit in one of their first engagements. This is a solid addition to the series and I highly recommend to anyone reading along.  

In Remembrance closes this omnibus and the first arc of the story of Gaunt’s Ghosts. It is told through the POV of an artist commissioned by a Vervunhive noble house to commemorate the war that took place in the novel Necropolis. The artist was explicitly told to represent the regiment that was so pivotal to the hive’s victory, the Tanith First and Only. As the sculptor spends time with the Ghosts in the dead hive city he is given a glimpse into what the victory cost the people of the city and the soldiers who survived the defense. As he accompanies a squad of Ghosts into the dead city on a run to clear an area of potential resistance still dug in, he is subjected to the horrors of battle. The story ends with him describing the statue he ends up erecting outside of the dead hive city and how he inevitably couldn’t fully capture his feelings from that day. In Remembrance was very humanistic compared to other Gaunt’s Ghosts novels and focusses on how the surroundings and events impact this non-combatant through whose eyes we see the events unfold. It was a very fitting end to the omnibus and I felt it was a great wrap up to Necropolis specifically.